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Depression

How to Cope with Adjustment Disorders Caused by Major Life Changing Events

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Adjusting to change can be difficult, as even positive life transitions tend to cause some stress. Over the course of a lifetime, a person can expect to experience a significant amount of change. Some of these changes, such as marriages, births, and new jobs, are generally positive, although they may be accompanied by their own unique stressors.

Other major life transitions, such as school closures or home schooling, working from home, new social distancing norms, moving to a new city, retirement, or entering the empty nest phase of life may cause a significant amount of stress.

Those who find themselves experiencing difficulty coping with life transitions may find it helpful to speak to a therapist in order to become better able to adjust to changes they cannot control.

How Can Change Be Beneficial?

Certain changes, such as going back to school, starting a new job, or starting a family, can often be exciting, even when they cause some amount of stress, because they are generally considered to be positive changes. Many people look forward to obtaining a degree, rising in their chosen field, or having a home and family.

Changes, and especially difficult changes, can influence personal growth, and dealing with a change successfully may leave one stronger, more confident, and better prepared for what comes next in life. In other words, even those changes that are neither expected nor wanted might still produce some beneficial outcome.

Change can encourage the development of skills or knowledge, and might also bring about greater awareness of a condition or group. For example, the family of a person diagnosed with schizophrenia might become more aware of severe mental health conditions and their effects. Or the parents of a child who has been diagnosed with depression might become interested in learning more about the topic to increase awareness.

Change can also make clear what is important in one’s life and allow for greater self-discovery and self-awareness.

Coping with Change

Because change can cause stress, it can have an effect on one’s daily life. A person facing a big change may experience depression, anxiety, or fatigue. The individual may also have headaches and develop trouble sleeping or eating well or abuse drugs and alcohol. Persistent symptoms of stress might improve with treatment in therapy.

Planning for changes in advance, as much as possible, and in conjunction with a therapist is always the ideal scenario.

  • Researching an upcoming change.Often, stress can develop out of fear of what is unknown. When one is well-informed about a change, it may be easier to face.
  • Attending to one’s physical and mental health.Being healthy in mind and body may make it easier to cope with changes in life. Sleeping well, exercising, and eating nutritional foods regularly may all be beneficial in improving both physical and mental health.
  • Taking time to relax. Remaining calm in spite of stress may be easier when one’s life is well-adjusted and includes time for leisure as well as work.
  • Limiting changes as much as possible.It may be helpful to avoid making a large change immediately after another change. Generally, adjusting to a change takes some time, and making multiple changes at once, even smaller ones, may not allow enough time for an adequate adjustment period, which can cause stress.
  • Discussing any difficulties adapting with another person.Family members may be able to help one adjust to change, but professional help may also benefit those experiencing difficulty or stress as a result of life changes.

Adjustment Disorder

A diagnosis of adjustment disorder can occur when a major life stress or change disrupts normal coping mechanisms and makes it difficult or impossible for a person to cope with new circumstances. Symptoms of this condition tend to begin within three months of the stress or change and often include a depressed or anxious mood, changes in daily habits, feelings of overwhelming stress and panic, difficulty enjoying activities, and changes in sleeping or eating.

This condition may also lead an individual to engage in reckless or dangerous behavior, avoid family and friends, or have thoughts of suicide. A diagnosed adjustment disorder generally indicates that a person is experiencing more emotional turmoil than others facing the same situation might experience.

For example, a young woman who cries frequently after the death of her mother is likely experiencing distress typical to the major life change she has experienced, but a man who lost his job and stops speaking to his children may be experiencing a significant amount of difficulty adjusting to his changed situation.

Therapy for Change

There is no particular treatment for adjusting to change, but several different tactics may be helpful. Talking about changes in life with a therapist, such as a marriage, the death of a family member, the loss of a job, current economic situations, frustration, or the approach of major life-changing events, can be helpful to many. Varying types of therapy is likely to be well-suited to helping a person cope with dramatic changes in life.

When life changes prove difficult and lead to stress, anxiety, or depression, a therapist can also help treat those issues and help one explore coping strategies. When people know that they do not cope well with change, speaking with a therapist before any significant changes in life occur may be warranted.

In this way, one can prepare for changes and become better able to face them in the future, even without prior knowledge of potential changes.

We are always here to help the people residing in McKinney, Plano, Dallas, Denton, Allen, Garland, and the surround communities found throughout Texas. If you are struggling to cope with life-changing events, or if you know someone that is experiencing challenges, please contact Foundations Counseling today.

8 Reasons to Talk to a Licensed Therapist Before Taking Antidepressants

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Some people are under the misapprehension that cognitive behavioral therapy may not be as helpful in extremely stressful and challenging times. So, many are turning to antianxiety or antidepressants. Over the last month, there is a massive increase of 35% turning to medications. Rather than simply taking medications, speaking with a licensed therapist is the best course of action.

In fact, successful or afflicted people do not fear therapy, they embrace their therapy. And therapy is not just something that smart people use, it’s something that most everybody should probably try during at least some point in their lives, especially now, during challenging times of anxiety or depression.

Many of us grew up under the impression that internal stuff shouldn’t be discussed or maybe it should be swept under the rug. This is perhaps the single worst thing you can do for yourself. Stamping down your emotions and not working through your psychological issues – especially economic downturns, job loss, or with societal anxiety, and depression – can culminate in a host of problems.

If you need a numbers-based reason to convince you to speak to a therapist before turning to antidepressants, depression alone is a major player in the global burden of disease, the leading cause of disability worldwide, and responsible for billions of dollars a year in lost work.

1. Therapy’s effects persist over the long-haul

A huge benefit of talk therapy is that its effects are long-lasting. This is because you’re not only working through stuff, but you’re also developing the tools to help you deal with future stuff. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) treatment is durable over the years. The positive gains continue and grow over time as though some of the work gets further consolidated after therapy stops.

The whole talking-with-the-therapist process gets internalized so that self-therapy picks up where the actual therapy leaves off. The “getting-to-the-cause” aspect of therapy is a big reason why therapy together is believed to be extremely effective.

2. Physical symptoms get treated

Psychological trauma can trigger physical symptoms – and depression and anxiety are well known to have significant, and sometimes debilitating, physical effects. Going to therapy can help these issues fade away.

When people do not express feelings but swallow them and keep them buried and out of conscious awareness, one’s body often reacts. Physical symptoms such as stomach aches, headaches, sleeping problems, and ulcers are just some of the ways our body reacts to stress and psychic pain.

3. Repressed emotions will come back to haunt you later on

The most serious drawback of not talking about things maybe that unexpressed feelings and traumas can pile up and explode later. Even if you don’t have a full-on breakdown later on, not fully processing events and emotions often creates negative thought patterns that can inform every area in your life – your relationships with your spouse, parents, kids, coworkers, and even yourself.

So, learning how to process them with a therapist can change how you maneuver in many different ways.

4. Therapy will give you a whole new perspective on other people

An awesome benefit of therapy is that it not only helps you understand yourself better but it helps you understand other people. When we hold negative thoughts in without processing them, they become ingrained so that we see the world through that lens – and we make lots of assumptions that may or may not be true.

Without the clutter of your own assumptions, it’s a lot easier to understand others’ intentions and motivations. Also, therapy can help an individual become more empathetic.

5. It helps you deal with future curveballs

Since big and small problems are going to come up from time to time, knowing how to deal with them in a healthy way is an essential skill. The truth is, conflict is a part of everyday life. It’s helpful to be aware of one’s feelings around conflict. If, for example, you are angry with your boss who is piling up work for you when you are getting ready to go away, you are bound to feel resentment and conflict.

By reflecting on what’s going on outside like your boss’ demands while working from home, and inside such as your mounting anger, irritation, and fear of losing your job if you say ‘no’, you are in a better position to resolve the conflict.

Talking things through with someone and reflecting on what feelings are evoked, and why, leads to a greater understanding of oneself. Then one is freer to think of ways to respond in a more proactive way.

Learning how not to get swallowed up by events, but instead how to form a game plan to deal with them, is the key.

6. You know you’re not alone

Seeing a licensed counselor, especially now, can be a huge relief in-and-of itself since you know you’re acting against what ails you. It also comforting just knowing that you have a built-in support structure that you can go to once a week.

Not that misery loves company, but it is true that being with people who are dealing with similar issues can be very reassuring.

7. It will rewire your brain

One of the best things about therapy is that it can bring about change at the level of the brain. We think of medication as changing the depressed brain, but there’s very compelling evidence that talk therapy does the same. With brain imaging methods, psychotherapy has been shown to alter activity in the “me-centered” worry thoughts, control, emotion, and fear.

One very effective method, such as cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), helps people identify the negative thought patterns and replace them with new and more positive mental habits or thoughts. In addition to helping people experience fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety, it brings about positive changes in one’s outlook.

8. You won’t have to self-medicate anymore

Self-medicating to “deal” with psychological stuff is incredibly common. But it doesn’t do anything to actually address what’s going on – in reality, it just masks it. It also creates an addictive cycle, which may exacerbate the real problem.

Getting to the root of your past stuff in therapy will, with time, eliminate the need to self-medicate. When you’re no longer living by the negative things in the past or even present, the need to avoid them will disappear.

Conclusion

People are starting to open up more about their personal struggles and mental health issues. The stigma seems to be fading, if slowly. If you feel therapy would benefit you, go for it. Most likely, your friends and family will also be grateful you opened up and it may give them the green light to do the same. Chances are it will help kick off some important dialogues during challenging times.

If you, or someone you know, needs additional support to deal with anxiety and depression during challenging times, please contact Foundations Counseling today!

Depression and the Economy

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Depression and the economy; not knowing is an uncomfortable experience. As human beings, we are naturally curious. We seek to understand, predict and control as much as we possibly can. The feeling of having some sort of control in our lives helps us learn and it keeps us safe. Uncertainty can feel dangerous because we cannot predict with complete confidence what will happen. As a result, both our hearts and minds may race.

While it is quite natural to experience uncertainty as uncomfortable, for many people it is seemingly unbearable. Seasoned professional therapists and counselors will suggest that finding it difficult to cope with the experience of not knowing could seriously affect our mental health – occurring alongside a number of conditions.

But does uncertainty, or economic uncertainty, play any part in causing depression? Depression and the economy can go hand-in-hand with mental health problems while learning how to cope.

It’s easy to see how the concept of uncertainty is linked to mental health. If uncertainty can feel dangerous, then it might feed our worry and anxiety. What’s more, if getting rid of that feeling of uncertainty feels essential, then the compulsion to wash our hands again and again to make sure they are clean and safe might also feel essential. If this condition of controlling things around you, it can trigger Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, for example.

And if we ultimately feel unable to cope with the change and unpredictability life throws at us, then it’s understandable that we are at risk of feeling defeated and depressed.

The Struggle with Uncertainty

The struggle with uncertainty does help us to understand depression. Some evidence suggests that we may find that our mood is more negative when we feel less able to cope with the unknown. But low mood is only part of the experience of depression, so fuller sessions are needed with a counselor to determine a variety of factors.

Understanding what underpins mental health difficulties is important because it can help us understand how to provide better support for the many of us who have these experiences. Mental health difficulties are more common in times of economic uncertainty, or uncertainty in one’s life in general. In fact, they often occur together including depression and the economy.

For example, the human process of thinking repeatedly and unhelpfully about our economic concerns or other worrisome aspects of our lives may lead to both anxiety and depression.

Another example of economic uncertainty is falling below the line of poverty. Poverty increases the risk of mental health problems and can be both a causal factor and a consequence of mental ill health. Mental health is shaped by the wide-ranging characteristics (including inequalities) of the social, economic and physical environments

in which people live. Successfully supporting the mental health and wellbeing of people living in poverty, or in times of economic uncertainty, and by reducing the number of people with mental health problems experiencing poverty, typically require engagement with a therapist.

Coping with Job Loss

Losing your job can be one of the most painful and traumatic events that you will ever have to endure. Depression and the economy, or economic situation, can affect every aspect of your life, from your interpersonal relationships to your sleep patterns. It can cause feelings of anger, inadequacy, fear, shame, failure, isolation, and embarrassment, to name just a few.

In fact, if you remain unemployed for an extended period, a situational depression may ensue. Job loss is one of the most life-changing experiences one ever faces. Its negative impact on individuals is exceeded only by the loss of a loved one or a family breakup.

Many professionals feel that other than the death of a child or going through a divorce, job loss is probably the single most terrible event of a lifetime.

What makes job loss so traumatic is the shattering blow that it delivers to the self-esteem. When you are let go from a position, for whatever reason, the underlying or subliminal message you may receive is, “I’m a failure. I am just not good enough. No matter what the economic times, if I were any good they would have kept me.”

Isolation and Counterproductive Behavior

Sudden job loss and economic uncertainty tends to have an isolating effect. When people undergo divorce or other painful experiences, they tend to share with those whom they trust. They talk it out with business associates, friends, and family.Consequently, there will always be people to comfort them and offer them advice.

Conversely, when people lose a job or feel like the economy may have a negative impact on their own lives, the last thing in the world that most people want to do is tell others what has happened, fearing that others will perceive them as failures or “exaggerating.”

In uncertain times or when dealing with job loss, many people will withdraw into a self-induced “code of silence” and wind up isolating themselves from the very people who are highly motivated to help. Unfortunately, this tendency to retreat behind self-created walls and limit social interaction is counterproductive to a job search or positive outlook that things will pass over time.

Minimize Stress When You’re Angry

Once reality sinks in that there is uncertainty, it’s natural to feel angry about losing your job or the economic situation. You might be mad at your employer, your former coworkers, the economy, or yourself. You might be mad at anyone and everyone around you.

It is always best to surround yourself with family and friends who understand your challenge. Perhaps seeking out professional counseling or guidance from your minister. There are also many community support groups available. Seek them out and participate in therapy if your anger turns to depression. In fact, you may not recognize the signs at first. As your outward anger subsides, you can start to move into the next stage.

Financial strain can make things worse, so avoid any rash money decisions that might stress you out later. For example, you probably don’t want to borrow from a retirement account or ignore your creditors during unemployment or a financial crisis, and you definitely want to avoid debt traps. These all have consequences that can add to your stress and fuel your anger or trigger depression.

If you or a loved one are having challenges confronting economic uncertainty, we highly encourage you to please reach out to Foundations Counseling today.

Do You Know Someone Suffering from Bipolar Disorder?

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Whether we are aware of it or not, we all may know someone suffering from Bipolar Disorder. Bipolar disorder is a mental health disorder that can cause dramatic changes in mood and energy levels. Symptoms can affect daily life severely with major ups-and-downs. Importantly, spotting the signs of bipolar disorder can help a person to get the proper treatment, as real dangers do exist.

A person who has Bipolar disorder will encounter a range in mood from feelings of elation and high energy to intense depression. There can also be disruption in sleep and thinking patterns and other behavioral symptoms.

The extremes of mood are known as manic episodes and depressive episodes. Hypomania has symptoms of a manic episode that are less severe.

Typically, in most cases, people suffering from Bipolar disorder do not experience symptoms usually until the age of 25 on average. Symptoms can appear during the teenage years, and less commonly, during childhood.

The Signs and Symptoms?

Bipolar disorder is a condition with mood swings that can range from euphoria to depression.However, for a diagnosis of “bipolar I” disorder, a person only needs to have one manic episode.

What is Mania?

When someone has mania, they do not just feel very happy. They feel euphoric.

A person with mania may:

  • Possess a lot of energy
  • Feel able to do and achieve anything
  • Find sleeping to be difficult
  • Spend money excessively and impulsively
  • Use rapid speech that jumps between topics and ideas
  • Feel agitated, jumpy, or even slightly “wired”
  • Engage in risky and impulsive behaviors
  • Use unwise consumption of alcohol and other substances
  • Believe that they are more important than others or have important connections
  • Show anger or aggression if others challenge their views or behavior

Severe mania can involve psychosis, with hallucinations or delusions. Hallucinations can cause a person to see, hear, or feel things that are not there.People may have delusions and distorted thinking that cause them to believe that certain things are true when they are not.

A person in a manic state may not realize that their behavior is unusual, but others may notice a change in behavior. Some may see the person’s outlook as sociable and fun-loving, while others may find it unusual or bizarre.

The individual may not realize that they are acting inappropriately or be aware of the potential consequences of their behavior.

They may need help in getting help and staying safe, which is where family and friends should step in to seek professional therapists.

What is Hypomania?

Not everyone will have a severe manic episode. Less severe mania is known as hypomania. Symptoms are similar to those of mania, but the behaviors are less extreme, people can often function well in their daily life, and it typically only lasts 3-4 days.

If a person does not address the signs of hypomania, it can progress into a more severe form of the condition at a later time.

Bipolar Depression Symptoms

Signs of a depressive episode are the same as the symptoms of a major depressive episode.These may include:

  • eeling down or sad
  • >having very little energy
  • having trouble sleeping or sleeping a lot more than usual
  • thinking of death or suicide
  • forgetting things or feeling distracted
  • feeling tired on a constant basis
  • losing enjoyment in daily activities
  • lack of emotion or joy in facial expressions

In severe cases, a person may experience psychosis or a catatonic depression, in which they are unable to move, talk, or take any action. Although rare, bipolar disorder could occur in young children and teenagers.

What are the Causes?

Doctors do not know exactly what causes bipolar disorder. In general, there are theories that may be triggers, as follows:

  1. Genetic factors: A person with bipolar disorder may have a parent with the condition. However, having a parent or even a twin with bipolar disorder does not mean a person will have it.
  1. Stress: Someone who has a genetic predisposition may experience their first episode of depression or mania during or after a time of severe stress, for example, the loss of a job or a loved one.

When to See a Therapist?

People with symptoms of Bipolar should seek professional help as soon as possible and as a precaution, at the very least. It is always a good idea to speak with a therapist when there is concern about severe mood swings that seem to come and go or make it difficult to work.

The best person to start with may be a primary care physician or family doctor. They will likely refer someone with these symptoms to a therapist, or a specialist who cares for people with mental health disorders.

Someone who notices these symptoms in a friend or loved one can also speak with atherapist about their concerns.

If you have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or believe that you may be suffering from bipolar disorder, please pick up the phone today and call our team at Foundations Counseling.

Tips On Overcoming Depression

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Depression rates have been steadily increasing over the past decade. It’s also said that 1 in 5 people may suffer from depression at one point in their lives. Depression can be very difficult, in part because there is no guaranteed cure that works for everyone. However, there are some things you can do to help you in overcoming depression.

3 Helpful Tips To Overcome Depression

1. Focus on what you’re usually doing right.

It may be hard for you to do right now because negative thoughts constantly alter positive results in your brain. However, you’re still trying, and this shows that you still have that chance to overcome it. At the end of your day, try listing down things you’ve done right. This may be difficult because of your current state of mind, but try listing just two or three things, even if they are small. This list will serve as a guide to help lift up your mood that you are not totally doing everything negatively or wrong.

2. Resist your urge to think of what happened in the past.

Being depressed lets you create images or scenes that constantly play over and over again. This habit forces you to give in to your depression and may be a threat to you emotionally. Loathing yourself or thinking of what you think you did wrong will not help you get past your depression. You should try to create new positive memories that may help you remove the negative ones from your current thoughts. Think of that new memory and how it made you feel at that time instead of the past that will constantly damage your emotion.

3. Let your social connections enter your life again.

Depression will more likely take you away from your friends and family, and will likely set you in a place where you are alone. It will then be present in your mind that being alone makes you feel better, but in reality, it doesn’t. We all need to have friends and family to talk to and lean on in times when we are sad. Having a person enter your comfort zone allows you to fight depression.

How Can Depression Counseling Help You

Since depression makes you want to be alone all the time and not want to go outside, it may be difficult for you to overcome it on your own. If you really want to help yourself get rid of your depression, then you should try seeking depression counseling. Depression counselors are someone that you can talk to about your problems. They can analyze your situation and provide you with accurate advice on how you can try to overcome those problems. They can give you specific tools to help lift your depression. They may even provide you with another point of view where the problem you are thinking of isn’t really a problem at all.

Tips On Dealing With Depression

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Depression is becoming a serious and alarming condition that affects many people. It drains your energy, hope, and will to do something you like. This makes it difficult for you to take the necessary steps to help yourself feel better. Depression is not something that you can easily get rid of when you begin to realize your symptoms. Recovering from depression takes time and the choices you make every day will impact the way you recover from it.

How To Deal With Depression

The key to dealing with depression is to start with small things that lighten up your mood and continue on from there. The first steps to deal with depression are often the hardest but may get easier as you continue to fight it. In most cases, you may feel like you don’t need anyone to help you in your recovery. On the contrary, you will need support from your friends or family. Reaching out for help is difficult as you feel better when isolating yourself from them. However, they play an essential role in your recovery because it is harder for you to maintain your own goals and motivate yourself to fight your depression alone.

Doing things that you normally would love doing will also help you in your recovery. Although you can’t force yourself to enjoy your favorite activities easily when you are depressed, you should still try to do them even if you don’t feel like it. Doing things that used to make you feel good and help you relax may help you remember how comforting it was for you.

Try going outside your home and walk or exercise. Even if getting out of your bed can seem to be a difficult task for you, you should still try to move. Exercise is a great depression fighter and is one of the most important tools to help you recover. Getting sunlight also helps you boost your serotonin levels that can improve your mood. Try exposing yourself to sunlight at least 15 to 20 minutes daily; it will help with your mood and prepare you for your next task you have in line.

How Depression Counseling Helps

Depression counselors are mental health counselors who are experts in depression.  Those who suffer from depression for a long period of time may not be able to recover from it alone. This is where depression counselors can come in and help them alleviate their symptoms to make them feel better. They have plenty of treatments that can help a person with depression recover. Most depression counselors use cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to treat their patients. This therapy is designed to help the person suffering from depression see a different side of him or her.

Depression is always easier to be treated when they are referred to depression counselors early. The longer you continue to fight depression on your own, the harder it may be for you to recover. If you feel like there are no results on your own way of dealing with your depression, then you should definitely seek a depression counselor’s aid.

How Can Therapists Help With Depression?

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Depression is a serious condition that is currently affecting many people. It causes people to feel sad and empty, and it can also alter their thinking patterns as well as their health. Depression’s symptoms can vary; the most common ones are anxiety, anger, and sadness. As someone experiences these common symptoms, it makes it difficult for them to live normally and it may even lead people to consider suicide.

What Causes Depression?

Depression can be caused by changes in a person’s brain. Serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine are neurotransmitters that provide our brain with feelings of happiness and pleasure. People suffering with depression can alter these neurotransmitters which will negate these feelings, and enable the person to feel sadness more often instead.

Depression may also be caused by current situations they may be in, such as having debt they can’t think of ways to pay, a recent divorce, a loss of a loved one, or being bullied. These situations can be stressful and traumatic which can trigger depression.

Depression is often diagnosed more in woman than in men. These statistics may be skewed, however, because men are less likely to seek treatment. Men with depression are often shown anger rather than sadness. Although anger is dominant in men, some studies have found that men that are depressed with sadness are more likely to attempt suicide. However, depression in women can lead to more suicide attempts. They may experience a form of depression like premenstrual dysphoria. This is where they may experience depression before their period, and during their period, the symptoms may only get worse.

How Can Therapists Help?

There are many helpful therapies one with depression can take. Depending on the counselor they seek help from, each have their own ways to help with depression. The most common therapies counselors will often advise those with depression to take are talk therapy and cognitive behavior therapy.

Talk therapy allows a person to give the therapist all their thoughts and basically allow them to let out all their thoughts. The therapist will then work with that person toward a solution to the cause of their depression. Cognitive behavior therapy helps a person recognize thoughts that lead to their negative emotions. The therapist will then see which thoughts may be the cause of their depression and try to change them.

Other forms of therapy are dialectical behavior therapy and Interpersonal therapy. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is another form of cognitive behavior therapy where the therapist recognizes what the person is feeling and tells them that what they are feeling is understandable. They will then try to alter those negative habits or disruptive behavior. Interpersonal therapy focuses on what is currently happening and attempts to help the person change. Therapists will often try to teach skills that may help lessen their symptoms.

There are many more therapies used to treat depression. Therapists that treat depression are all experts in diagnosing what a specific person needs to help cure their symptoms. This is why if you think you have a friend or relative that may be experiencing symptoms of depression, then you should encourage them to seek aid immediately.

Signs of Depression and How Counselors Can Help

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We all can feel sad and lonely at times; it’s very normal to feel these things. However, when these feelings become too overwhelming, then it may lead to depression. Depression is pretty common nowadays and has affected many people in different ways. Even celebrities have experiences with depression which basically means that even if you are wealthy, you still have chances of getting depressed. If left untreated, the symptoms can get worse and may interfere with your daily activities. In some cases, a person dealing with depression for too long can start thinking of suicide.

5 Most Common Signs Of Depression

  1. The most common symptom of depression is when one feels helpless or even worthless. They are surrounded by negative thoughts that make them feel that they can’t do anything right and that they are a burden to their family or work.
  2. Loss of interest in daily activities or not being able to perform well is another symptom that they might be depressed. It’s pretty common for those suffering from depression to lose their interest, because they are constantly thinking of the negative thoughts that are contributing to their depression.
  3. Most men that are suffering from depression can be easily angered or irritated, and can sometimes lead to reckless behavior. A simple joke or act can trigger their anger and may lead to them becoming violent enough to inflict physical injuries.
  4. Another common symptom is when a person experiences loss of appetite or has sudden weight changes. They are too overwhelmed by the negative thoughts or feelings that they are keeping in, which also lead to them neglecting their own personal needs.
  5. As they neglect their own personal needs, they will also no longer be sociable or will always prefer to be alone. They will rather sit in a corner and think than have friends come over or go to social events.

How Can Counselors Help With Depression?

Talk therapy is one of the most common forms of therapies used by counselors. It helps those with depression to cope with their feelings or problems that are contributing to their symptoms. Talk therapy allows you to talk about your problems and find solutions that can help you deal with the problem. Some therapists even ask you to write down everything you’ve done throughout the day, including your mood.

However, most therapies prefer to approach you directly and focus on your current thoughts. It’s ok to think about the past only to figure out why you are depressed. But, when dealing with the current situation, the therapist can help you find ways to deal with your situation now and how you can for the future.

If you have a friend or relative that is currently showing any of these signs, then don’t hesitate to seek expert help. It’s always good to be a step ahead and be able to treat depression before it builds up and becomes worse. If you have a friend or relative that is currently showing any of these signs, then don’t hesitate to seek expert help. It’s always good to be a step ahead and be able to treat depression before it builds up and becomes worse.